Reblogged from Death by Elocution
Reblogged from Death by Elocution
thearchitekblueprint:

pay attention to her

thearchitekblueprint:

pay attention to her

Reblogged from K.N.O.W.

A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (1988)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (1988)

Reblogged from O R B I S
lelaid:

Grace Jones by James Baes for Lui, 1982

lelaid:

Grace Jones by James Baes for Lui, 1982

a-state-of-bliss:

Iman by Helmut Newton

a-state-of-bliss:

Iman by Helmut Newton

Reblogged from

Kouka Webb

Kouka Webb

Reblogged from tontita frita
isteiro:

Natalia Vodianova at Miu Miu A/W 2003-04

isteiro:

Natalia Vodianova at Miu Miu A/W 2003-04

Reblogged from
Reblogged from lets get high.
Reblogged from Black Like God
sitxlys:

sitxlys:

following back tons

sitxlys:

sitxlys:

following back tons
Reblogged from
Reblogged from Death by Elocution
Reblogged from Nickel Cobalt
vicemag:

Will the Climate Change March Make a Difference to the Elites Who Run the World? 

On Sunday, more than 300,000 people came out for the People’s Climate March in Manhattan. Easily the largest environmental rally in history, the spectacle was a diverse and frenetic show of force, and in that sense was a spectacular success. The lingering question that was hanging over the proceedings still remains, however: Is all of that sound and fury going to make a difference to the global elites meeting across town at the United Nations for the latest Very Important Climate Change Summit on Tuesday?
Led by a procession of indigenous peoples, activists got things started just before 11:30 AM. In addition to your typical flower-adorned hippie types, there were black and Hispanic kids from around the country. The summer of police brutality punctuated by the death of Eric Garner in New York and Michael Brown in Missouri was never far from the surface, their names intermittently chanted by the legions of protesters.

The event was essentially a giant party. Elaborate floats coasted slowly down the street surrounded by activists with signs demanding action and marching bands. Inside the crowd was a smattering of radicals convinced that the environmental movement’s leaders are kidding themselves if they think carbon emissions can be reduced—and global warming’s worst effects averted—without dramatically reshaping the global economy.
Continue

vicemag:

Will the Climate Change March Make a Difference to the Elites Who Run the World? 

On Sunday, more than 300,000 people came out for the People’s Climate March in Manhattan. Easily the largest environmental rally in history, the spectacle was a diverse and frenetic show of force, and in that sense was a spectacular success. The lingering question that was hanging over the proceedings still remains, however: Is all of that sound and fury going to make a difference to the global elites meeting across town at the United Nations for the latest Very Important Climate Change Summit on Tuesday?

Led by a procession of indigenous peoples, activists got things started just before 11:30 AM. In addition to your typical flower-adorned hippie types, there were black and Hispanic kids from around the country. The summer of police brutality punctuated by the death of Eric Garner in New York and Michael Brown in Missouri was never far from the surface, their names intermittently chanted by the legions of protesters.

The event was essentially a giant party. Elaborate floats coasted slowly down the street surrounded by activists with signs demanding action and marching bands. Inside the crowd was a smattering of radicals convinced that the environmental movement’s leaders are kidding themselves if they think carbon emissions can be reduced—and global warming’s worst effects averted—without dramatically reshaping the global economy.

Continue

Reblogged from VICE